Post #17

Post #17 09192019

Fenben (fenbendazole) is readily available without a prescription on Amazon or elsewhere because it is an ingredient in a deworming drug manufactured by Merck for treatment of animals. The product is called Panacur C, containing about 22% fenben. This drug has a long history of use, with no side effects, if human use is any measure. Human beings who have used it have experienced no side effects at the dosages described below.

The dose of fenben I am using is based on the dosage used by people who have successfully cured their own cancer – one gram of Panacur/day (so 220 mg of fenben.) Assuming the human user was a 150 pound man (I don’t really know this) and Spirit weighs 90 pounds, the dose I use is 90/150 X 1000 mg (1 gram) = 600 mg of Panacur C. It is a white powder that I sprinkle into his dog food. I am not exact about this when weighing it out – anywhere between 600-650 mg is OK with me.

I should say I bought a scale on Amazon that weighs in the mg range – the Diagtree Digital Milligram Pocket Scale for $17 and it works just great, simple to use and exactly what I needed and wanted. Very pleased with it so far.

I also created a daily chart where I record the dose given, scores for his appetite (poor to normal), energy level (score from low to high), character of his feces (runny, soft, firm, etc).

I will also have his liver function (called a chem. 12 blood panel) checked by my local vet each month just to be on the safe side. Checking the health of the liver is a measure of whether the body is eliminating the drug adequately. This is not cheap – $150 for a complete blood panel. But I will do this for 2-3 months and if it all looks good, likely reduce testing to once every 3-4 months.

So far, after two weeks of administering fenben, Spirit’s energy level, appetite and stools all look fine.

Is it working?

He appears to be in top notch health right now.

But, if he dies of cancer at any age, we would have to say no, or at least not good enough to be called a cure. If he lives the normal life of a Golden Retriever (10-12 years) and does not die of cancer, I would say yes.

Since about 2/3 of all GR’s die of cancer and he already has cancer, I am inclined to keep him on some dosage level of fenben for the rest of his life. Maybe after the initial 6 month chemo treatment period, I can go to some lower, as yet undetermined, dose (even up to the present dosage) – and maybe not every day – will have to think more about this.

As a sideways thought, if I was ever diagnosed with cancer myself, the way I feel now, I would take fenben rather than go through the whole surgery/conventional chemo/radiation routine. At my age (81) I am not up to that ordeal. I have lived a long and good life.